Above is the cover design for Sterling’s Gold, Roger Sterling’s mock memoir filled with “wit and wisdom of an ad man.”
"…During his long and illustrious career, Sterling has come into contact  with all the luminaries and would-be luminaries of the advertising  world, and he has acquired quite a reputation among his colleagues for  his quips, barbs, and witticisms. A few “sterling” examples…” —Grove Atlantic

Above is the cover design for Sterling’s Gold, Roger Sterling’s mock memoir filled with “wit and wisdom of an ad man.”

"…During his long and illustrious career, Sterling has come into contact with all the luminaries and would-be luminaries of the advertising world, and he has acquired quite a reputation among his colleagues for his quips, barbs, and witticisms. A few “sterling” examples…” —Grove Atlantic

"Swizzle sticks in the "Mad Men" era and beyond"

They were already a hot item when all they did was stir. But it was inventor Jay Sindler who, in 1934, revolutionized swizzle sticks with an advertising idea that would equal any marketing ploy cooked up by Don Draper at Sterling Cooper. And like Don’s, his timing was perfect.
The Gibson Girls and then flappers of the Roaring ’20s used swizzle sticks made of glass and newly invented Bakelite plastic…
—Stephen Visakay and Maddy Lederman for Los Angeles Times

(photo by Anne Cusack, via latimes.com)

"Swizzle sticks in the "Mad Men" era and beyond"

They were already a hot item when all they did was stir. But it was inventor Jay Sindler who, in 1934, revolutionized swizzle sticks with an advertising idea that would equal any marketing ploy cooked up by Don Draper at Sterling Cooper. And like Don’s, his timing was perfect.

The Gibson Girls and then flappers of the Roaring ’20s used swizzle sticks made of glass and newly invented Bakelite plastic…

—Stephen Visakay and Maddy Lederman for Los Angeles Times

(photo by Anne Cusack, via latimes.com)

Mad Men characters get the Barbie and Ken doll treatment.
"…The characters to become dolls are Don Draper, the show’s leading man; his wife, Betty; his colleague at the Sterling Cooper agency, Roger Sterling; and Joan Holloway, the agency’s office manager who was Roger’s mistress.  That two dolls represent a relationship outside wedlock, and Don Draper’s propensity for adultery, may be firsts for the Barbie world since the brand’s introduction five decades ago. But for the sake of the Barbie image, her immersion in the “Mad Men” era will go only so far: The dolls come with period accessories like hats, overcoats, pearls and padded undergarments, but no cigarettes, ashtrays, martini glasses or cocktail shakers…
— via The New York Times

Mad Men characters get the Barbie and Ken doll treatment.

"…The characters to become dolls are Don Draper, the show’s leading man; his wife, Betty; his colleague at the Sterling Cooper agency, Roger Sterling; and Joan Holloway, the agency’s office manager who was Roger’s mistress. That two dolls represent a relationship outside wedlock, and Don Draper’s propensity for adultery, may be firsts for the Barbie world since the brand’s introduction five decades ago. But for the sake of the Barbie image, her immersion in the “Mad Men” era will go only so far: The dolls come with period accessories like hats, overcoats, pearls and padded undergarments, but no cigarettes, ashtrays, martini glasses or cocktail shakers…

— via The New York Times

Sesame Street’s Mad Men parody coming soon?
"…The show celebrates its 40th anniversary on November 10. It’ll be a normal episode, with a focus on the new curriculum and a little bit of retrospective. This seems odd to me, but when you realize that a) the Sesame Workshop has been hit as hard as everyone else in this economy, and b) we were on the nostalgia train five years ago for the 35th anniversary, it makes more sense…" (via TV Squad)

Sesame Street’s Mad Men parody coming soon?

"…The show celebrates its 40th anniversary on November 10. It’ll be a normal episode, with a focus on the new curriculum and a little bit of retrospective. This seems odd to me, but when you realize that a) the Sesame Workshop has been hit as hard as everyone else in this economy, and b) we were on the nostalgia train five years ago for the 35th anniversary, it makes more sense…" (via TV Squad)