andrewromano

andrewromano:

The June Wayne House by Alvin Lustig (1949-1950)

Today, Alvin Lustig is remembered primarily as a graphic designer. But in the 1940s and 1950s—the peak of his productivity and creativity—his main ambition was to break down the boundaries between two-dimensional and three-dimensional design. He created furniture, lighting fixtures, interiors, signage, a pair of hotels, and even a helicopter.

He also designed a house—the one pictured above, in the Hollywood Hills, for the artist June Wayne

For 60 years, only one picture of the Wayne House has been known to exist: a black and white image taken by Julius Shulman

But as I was wandering around Flickr last night, I stumbled upon a batch of slide scans that had just been uploaded by Doug Dupin earlier that day. And among them were these images: never-before-seen photographs of the Wayne House. In color. From when it was newly built.

An amazing find. 

Doug is in the process of uploading hundreds of other images of California midcentury modernist architecture from a personal collection that he recently rescued. More to come on those photos—and on Lustig’s residential architecture.

perfectly spooky, beautiful LEGO Victorian style mansion
With 100,000 unaltered LEGO pieces, Mike Doyle constructs the striking black & white Victorian on Mud Heap. This is the third architectural home in Doyle’s Abandoned Houses series.
The artist shares fascinating “The Making Of…”  and “Work in Progress” posts on his blog which highlight the meticulous craft involved in building the structures.
The first three LEGO MOCs in the series are available as limited-edition glicée prints through Bumble and Bramble, including Three Story Victorian with Tree and Two Story with Basement
(first discovered via Brothers Brick)

perfectly spooky, beautiful LEGO Victorian style mansion

With 100,000 unaltered LEGO pieces, Mike Doyle constructs the striking black & white Victorian on Mud Heap. This is the third architectural home in Doyle’s Abandoned Houses series.

The artist shares fascinating “The Making Of…”  and “Work in Progress” posts on his blog which highlight the meticulous craft involved in building the structures.

The first three LEGO MOCs in the series are available as limited-edition glicée prints through Bumble and Bramble, including Three Story Victorian with Tree and Two Story with Basement

(first discovered via Brothers Brick)

OMA exhibition: (im)pure, (in)formal, (un)built at école des beaux-arts in Paris
“…Made in collaboration with students at the Paris Malaquais School of Architecture, the exhibition focuses on three French libraries designed by OMA, two of them unrealized but crucially important in the development of the typology of libraries, one about to go under construction…” —OMA
(first discovered via design boom, photos by Clement Guillaume)

OMA exhibition: (im)pure, (in)formal, (un)built at école des beaux-arts in Paris

“…Made in collaboration with students at the Paris Malaquais School of Architecture, the exhibition focuses on three French libraries designed by OMA, two of them unrealized but crucially important in the development of the typology of libraries, one about to go under construction…” —OMA

(first discovered via design boom, photos by Clement Guillaume)

 book shelves up to the ceiling, my dream house…
“Shelf-Pod is a private residence and study building, located in Osaka  prefecture, Japan. The client owns an extensive collection of books on  the subject of Islamic history, so he requested that we create this  building with the maximum capacity for its storage and exhibition…” —Kazuya Morita Architecture Studio
(via Core 77)

 book shelves up to the ceiling, my dream house…

Shelf-Pod is a private residence and study building, located in Osaka prefecture, Japan. The client owns an extensive collection of books on the subject of Islamic history, so he requested that we create this building with the maximum capacity for its storage and exhibition…” —Kazuya Morita Architecture Studio

(via Core 77)

Where books go to heaven…
The interior design of the Livraria da Vila bookstore in São Paulo, Brazil, was designed by the architect, Isay Weinfeld. From the ceiling to the street facing windows, to the doors created out of bookshelves, one is incapsulated with 360 degree view of books on the shelf. This is such creative use of space and displaying books that it seems as though each room has a different ambiance.
(via Toxel, via ArchDaily, underground floor photo by Leonaro Finotti)

Where books go to heaven…

The interior design of the Livraria da Vila bookstore in São Paulo, Brazil, was designed by the architect, Isay Weinfeld. From the ceiling to the street facing windows, to the doors created out of bookshelves, one is incapsulated with 360 degree view of books on the shelf. This is such creative use of space and displaying books that it seems as though each room has a different ambiance.

(via Toxel, via ArchDaily, underground floor photo by Leonaro Finotti)