Little Nemo falling through “GOOGLE-Land”
The search giant honors the 107th anniversary of Winsor McCay’s “Little Nemo” with an imaginative, interactive Google Doodle inspired by the original, illustrative style of the “Little Nemo in Slumberland” comic strip.
(In October of 1905, Winsor McCay’s comic strip, “Little Nemo in Slumberland,” began its printed run in newspapers. Some later printings of the fantastical comic strip were renamed “In the Land of Wonderful Dreams.”)

Little Nemo falling through “GOOGLE-Land”

The search giant honors the 107th anniversary of Winsor McCay’s “Little Nemo” with an imaginative, interactive Google Doodle inspired by the original, illustrative style of the “Little Nemo in Slumberland” comic strip.

(In October of 1905, Winsor McCay’s comic strip, “Little Nemo in Slumberland,” began its printed run in newspapers. Some later printings of the fantastical comic strip were renamed “In the Land of Wonderful Dreams.”)

redesignrelated
redesignrelated:

Wonder Woman character redesign from DC Comics
At 69 years old, Wonder Woman undergoes another wardrobe and body makeover for issue no. 600 of the comic book.
“…The new costume was designed by the artist Jim Lee, who in February was named co-publisher of DC, alongside Dan DiDio. Given the assignment, “my first reaction was, ‘Oh my gosh,’ ” Mr. Lee said in an interview. But he welcomed the challenge: “When these characters become so branded that you can’t change things, they become ossified.”  The new look — with an understated “W” insignia, a midnight blue jacket and a flinty fusion of black tights and boots — is darker than the famed swimsuit-style outfit, and aims to be contemporary, functional and, as Tim Gunn of “Project Runway” might say, less costumey…” —via The New York Times
see also the NYT “Evolution of Wonder Woman” slideshow

redesignrelated:

Wonder Woman character redesign from DC Comics

At 69 years old, Wonder Woman undergoes another wardrobe and body makeover for issue no. 600 of the comic book.

“…The new costume was designed by the artist Jim Lee, who in February was named co-publisher of DC, alongside Dan DiDio. Given the assignment, “my first reaction was, ‘Oh my gosh,’ ” Mr. Lee said in an interview. But he welcomed the challenge: “When these characters become so branded that you can’t change things, they become ossified.” The new look — with an understated “W” insignia, a midnight blue jacket and a flinty fusion of black tights and boots — is darker than the famed swimsuit-style outfit, and aims to be contemporary, functional and, as Tim Gunn of “Project Runway” might say, less costumey…” —via The New York Times

see also the NYT “Evolution of Wonder Woman” slideshow