iTypewriter
Longing for the nostalgic clickity clack sound of typing keys on a typewriter? The concept of the iTypewriter accessory by industrial designer Austin Yang, tries to mix the clunkiness and noise of a retro-style typewriter with the new technology and sleek design of Apple’s iPad tablet.
The designer explains the concept for the iTypewriter prototype in his own words:

“It is a typewriter for the ipad. Users can enjoy the old feeling of typing and also the lastest technology…People could be able to recollect old experience and memory by familiar appearance and haptic feedback. Instead of stroking on the screen with no feedback…User can experience the physical strength transfer from the keypad and the movement of each key.”
—Austin Yang, on the iTypewriter

(discovered via mashable, hear the slow typing via youtube)

iTypewriter

Longing for the nostalgic clickity clack sound of typing keys on a typewriter? The concept of the iTypewriter accessory by industrial designer Austin Yang, tries to mix the clunkiness and noise of a retro-style typewriter with the new technology and sleek design of Apple’s iPad tablet.

The designer explains the concept for the iTypewriter prototype in his own words:

“It is a typewriter for the ipad. Users can enjoy the old feeling of typing and also the lastest technology…People could be able to recollect old experience and memory by familiar appearance and haptic feedback. Instead of stroking on the screen with no feedback…User can experience the physical strength transfer from the keypad and the movement of each key.”

Austin Yang, on the iTypewriter

(discovered via mashable, hear the slow typing via youtube)

Pantone Skin Color Spectrum portraits
The HUMANAE project is a color focused photography series by Angélica Dass.
“…Brazilian artist Angélica Dass (Pantone 7522 C) undertook her Humanae project as a means of discussing cultural and racial identifiers… The result isn’t a complete depiction of each subject’s skin color and isn’t nearly the “scientific measurement” Dass claims it is, but when the images are seen together, it’s interesting to see the shifts and changes in skin color…” —io9
“…The project applies the alphanumerical classification of the Pantone coloring system to human skin tone, communicated through a photographed portraiture series. The background of each piece is dyed the exact shade extracted from a sample of 11 x 11 pixels from the very face of the people depicted…” —designboom
(first discovered via flavorwire via designboom)

Pantone Skin Color Spectrum portraits

The HUMANAE project is a color focused photography series by Angélica Dass.

“…Brazilian artist Angélica Dass (Pantone 7522 C) undertook her Humanae project as a means of discussing cultural and racial identifiers… The result isn’t a complete depiction of each subject’s skin color and isn’t nearly the “scientific measurement” Dass claims it is, but when the images are seen together, it’s interesting to see the shifts and changes in skin color…” —io9

“…The project applies the alphanumerical classification of the Pantone coloring system to human skin tone, communicated through a photographed portraiture series. The background of each piece is dyed the exact shade extracted from a sample of 11 x 11 pixels from the very face of the people depicted…” —designboom

(first discovered via flavorwire via designboom)

redesignrelated
redesignrelated:

Dowling Duncan submits a unique currency redesign concept for Richard Smith’s Dollar ReDe$ign Project.
“…We have kept the width the same as the existing dollars. However we have changed the size of the note so that the one dollar is shorter and the 100 dollar is the longest. When stacked on top of each other it is easy to see how much money you have. It also makes it easier for the visually impaired to distinguish between notes…”—Dowling Duncan on the proposed redesign for US bank notes

redesignrelated:

Dowling Duncan submits a unique currency redesign concept for Richard Smith’s Dollar ReDe$ign Project.

“…We have kept the width the same as the existing dollars. However we have changed the size of the note so that the one dollar is shorter and the 100 dollar is the longest. When stacked on top of each other it is easy to see how much money you have. It also makes it easier for the visually impaired to distinguish between notes…”
Dowling Duncan on the proposed redesign for US bank notes