Logobook

“The monumental archive Houplain amassed is the foundation of this ultimate logo reference guide, featuring approximately 7,000 specimens organized alphabetically, with information about the designers, year of creation, country, brand, and company. Moreover, the book includes an extensive critical essay on brand culture by French philosopher Gilles Lipovetsky, and an introduction by Ludovic Houplain explaining the creation process of the film Logorama, from its inception to its finalization.” —Taschen

Logobook

The monumental archive Houplain amassed is the foundation of this ultimate logo reference guide, featuring approximately 7,000 specimens organized alphabetically, with information about the designers, year of creation, country, brand, and company. Moreover, the book includes an extensive critical essay on brand culture by French philosopher Gilles Lipovetsky, and an introduction by Ludovic Houplain explaining the creation process of the film Logorama, from its inception to its finalization.” —Taschen

Vogue covers by Parisian artist André Edouard Marty
When I saw a post about “The Art of Vogue Covers,” my eye was first drawn towards the elegant composition and illustration on the July 23, 1930 issue. The seemingly sparse magazine cover makes wonderful use of white space, with subtle smoke travelling upwards to blend softly into the thick, hand-lettered Vogue masthead.

Above is another fashionable Vogue cover with full-bleed art of a woman painting. On this cover from August 1929, “Vogue” looks painted in cursive, with each letter linking to the next without hesitation, one continuous stroke of a brush.
Both covers are by André Edouard Marty. I’m slightly embarrassed that I was unfamiliar with the artist A. E. Marty until today.
(discovered via scans from The Art of Vogue Covers book via Miss Moss)

Vogue covers by Parisian artist André Edouard Marty

When I saw a post about “The Art of Vogue Covers,” my eye was first drawn towards the elegant composition and illustration on the July 23, 1930 issue. The seemingly sparse magazine cover makes wonderful use of white space, with subtle smoke travelling upwards to blend softly into the thick, hand-lettered Vogue masthead.

vintage Vogue cover artwork by André Edouard Marty

Above is another fashionable Vogue cover with full-bleed art of a woman painting. On this cover from August 1929, “Vogue” looks painted in cursive, with each letter linking to the next without hesitation, one continuous stroke of a brush.

Both covers are by André Edouard Marty. I’m slightly embarrassed that I was unfamiliar with the artist A. E. Marty until today.

(discovered via scans from The Art of Vogue Covers book via Miss Moss)

While Mortals Sleep by Kurt Vonnegut, book cover design by Lynn Buckley
After Carin Goldberg’s strong, iconic branding system for Vonnegut classics in the late 1980s, it was likely an exciting challenge for a cover designer to repackage the backlist again. Lynn Buckley established a new paperback series design for the books in 2009, which extends to previously unpublished works.

While Mortals Sleep by Kurt Vonnegut, book cover design by Lynn Buckley

After Carin Goldberg’s strong, iconic branding system for Vonnegut classics in the late 1980s, it was likely an exciting challenge for a cover designer to repackage the backlist again. Lynn Buckley established a new paperback series design for the books in 2009, which extends to previously unpublished works.

limited edition of Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84
“This limited edition of Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84 was a collaboration between Kristen Harrison here at The Curved House, Simon Rhodes of Harvill Secker (an imprint of Random House) and designer Stefanie Posavec. The edition was strictly limited to 111 copies signed by the author…” — The Curved House
(via typoretum)

limited edition of Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84

“This limited edition of Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84 was a collaboration between Kristen Harrison here at The Curved House, Simon Rhodes of Harvill Secker (an imprint of Random House) and designer Stefanie Posavec. The edition was strictly limited to 111 copies signed by the author…” — The Curved House

(via typoretum)

vintage book covers on shelf transformed into stop-motion love story

Filmmaker Spike Jonze worked with handbag designer Olympia Le-Tan and director Simon Cahn to create Mourir Auprès de Toi. The end result is a beautiful stop motion animated short film set inside the Shakespeare & Company book shop in Paris.

“Designer Olympia Le-Tan’s embroidered clutch-bags spring to life in director Spike Jonze’s tragicomic stop-motion animation Mourir Auprès de Toi (To Die By Your Side). On a shelf in famed Parisian bookstore Shakespeare and Company, the star-crossed love story of a klutzy skeleton and his flame-haired amour plays out amidst Le-Tan’s illustrations of iconic first-edition book covers…” —Nowness

There is a video that gives a peak behind the scenes of making Mourir Auprès de Toi (To Die By Your Side).

Can you spot the Alvin Lustig inspired dust jacket design on the book shelf?