Little Nemo falling through “GOOGLE-Land”
The search giant honors the 107th anniversary of Winsor McCay’s “Little Nemo” with an imaginative, interactive Google Doodle inspired by the original, illustrative style of the “Little Nemo in Slumberland” comic strip.
(In October of 1905, Winsor McCay’s comic strip, “Little Nemo in Slumberland,” began its printed run in newspapers. Some later printings of the fantastical comic strip were renamed “In the Land of Wonderful Dreams.”)

Little Nemo falling through “GOOGLE-Land”

The search giant honors the 107th anniversary of Winsor McCay’s “Little Nemo” with an imaginative, interactive Google Doodle inspired by the original, illustrative style of the “Little Nemo in Slumberland” comic strip.

(In October of 1905, Winsor McCay’s comic strip, “Little Nemo in Slumberland,” began its printed run in newspapers. Some later printings of the fantastical comic strip were renamed “In the Land of Wonderful Dreams.”)

tactile atlas for the blind, c. 1837

“The Atlas of the United States Printed for the Use of the Blind was published in 1837 for children at the New England Institute for the Education of the Blind in Boston. Without a drop of ink in the book, the text and maps in this extraordinary atlas were embossed heavy paper with letters, lines, and symbols. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first atlas produced for the blind to read without the assistance of a sighted person. Braille was invented by 1825, but was not widely used until later. It represented letters well, but could not represent shapes and cartographic features. Samuel Gridley Howe (1801-1876) was the founder and president of the New England Institute (later known as the Perkins Institute) and produced the atlas with the assistance of John C. Cray and Samuel P. Ruggles. Howe was the husband of Julia Ward Howe, the American abolitionist and author of the U.S. Civil War song “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” He was a champion of people with disabilities and believed that blind youth could be taught geography through  maps created with his special paper embossing process. In his introduction to the atlas Howe notes that crude attempts had been made to create maps for the blind, but they used primitive methods of creating relief and required the assistance of a sighted person. He claimed that his new embossing method was superior in all respects…”—David Rumsey Historical Map Colletion

The David Rumsey Map collection is an incredible resource and includes large scans of this rare atlas, including the marbleized cover & title page.
(full spread and details on above embossed map of Florida)

tactile atlas for the blind, c. 1837


“The Atlas of the United States Printed for the Use of the Blind was published in 1837 for children at the New England Institute for the Education of the Blind in Boston. Without a drop of ink in the book, the text and maps in this extraordinary atlas were embossed heavy paper with letters, lines, and symbols. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first atlas produced for the blind to read without the assistance of a sighted person. Braille was invented by 1825, but was not widely used until later. It represented letters well, but could not represent shapes and cartographic features. Samuel Gridley Howe (1801-1876) was the founder and president of the New England Institute (later known as the Perkins Institute) and produced the atlas with the assistance of John C. Cray and Samuel P. Ruggles. Howe was the husband of Julia Ward Howe, the American abolitionist and author of the U.S. Civil War song “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” He was a champion of people with disabilities and believed that blind youth could be taught geography through  maps created with his special paper embossing process. In his introduction to the atlas Howe notes that crude attempts had been made to create maps for the blind, but they used primitive methods of creating relief and required the assistance of a sighted person. He claimed that his new embossing method was superior in all respects…”
David Rumsey Historical Map Colletion

The David Rumsey Map collection is an incredible resource and includes large scans of this rare atlas, including the marbleized cover & title page.

(full spread and details on above embossed map of Florida)


As Steve Jobs officially resigns as Apple’s CEO, I’m less interested in reading about the succession plan for Apple and the percentage the company’s stock is dropping only hours after reading his letter.
To remember just how much innovation Steve Jobs contributed to the world of technology and design, the Wall Street Journal has pulled together images in their feature Personal Media Pioneer: Steve Jobs. Gizmodo highlights The Life of Steve Jobs—So Far with old photographs, ads, and a lengthly timeline. In 1986, “Jobs buys Pixar out of Lucasfilm’s computer graphics group for a  discounted price of $10m—$5m of which will be used for operations—so  that Lucas could finance his divorce without selling Star Wars stock.”
In the 1970s, Jobs also worked at Atari as a technician. PodTech has an interesting podcast with Atari’s co-founder about the experience of working with Steve Jobs.
(above photo c. early 1980s)

As Steve Jobs officially resigns as Apple’s CEO, I’m less interested in reading about the succession plan for Apple and the percentage the company’s stock is dropping only hours after reading his letter.

To remember just how much innovation Steve Jobs contributed to the world of technology and design, the Wall Street Journal has pulled together images in their feature Personal Media Pioneer: Steve Jobs. Gizmodo highlights The Life of Steve Jobs—So Far with old photographs, ads, and a lengthly timeline. In 1986, “Jobs buys Pixar out of Lucasfilm’s computer graphics group for a discounted price of $10m—$5m of which will be used for operations—so that Lucas could finance his divorce without selling Star Wars stock.”

In the 1970s, Jobs also worked at Atari as a technician. PodTech has an interesting podcast with Atari’s co-founder about the experience of working with Steve Jobs.

(above photo c. early 1980s)

“Cold War Relics: The Wende Museum Saves Communist Design” 
Steven Heller interviews the Founder and Director for the Wende Museum in Culver City, Justinian Jampol.

"From toys to chunks of the Berlin Wall, this California-based  collection is showing that Cold War design is more than just propaganda."—Steven Heller

The publisher Taschen is publishing a large book for "the world’s largest Cold War visual archive" in 2012 to coincide with the Wende Museum’s 10th anniversary.
(via The Atlantic)

“Cold War Relics: The Wende Museum Saves Communist Design”

Steven Heller interviews the Founder and Director for the Wende Museum in Culver City, Justinian Jampol.

"From toys to chunks of the Berlin Wall, this California-based collection is showing that Cold War design is more than just propaganda."
Steven Heller

The publisher Taschen is publishing a large book for "the world’s largest Cold War visual archive" in 2012 to coincide with the Wende Museum’s 10th anniversary.

(via The Atlantic)

“Swoosh: 40 Years Fly By” 
Steven Heller looks back on the interesting history and “DNA” of the iconic Nike logo, the evolution from a “stripe” to a “swoosh,” and that infamous “bargain brand” first designed in 1969 by Carolyn Davidson, supposedly for a mere $35. She was a graphic design student at the time.
The final variation of the design was launched to the public in June 1971.

“Swoosh: 40 Years Fly By” 

Steven Heller looks back on the interesting history and “DNA” of the iconic Nike logo, the evolution from a “stripe” to a “swoosh,” and that infamous “bargain brand” first designed in 1969 by Carolyn Davidson, supposedly for a mere $35. She was a graphic design student at the time.

The final variation of the design was launched to the public in June 1971.