Giant LEGO forest with garden flowers in Australia

“LEGO is celebrating 50 years in australia with an array of installations across the country, with the most recent set up in the rural town of Broken Hill, New South Wales. residents of the outback locale were surprised to wake up to a life-size forest made up of 15 four-meter high pine trees and flower sets recreated to a 1:1 ratio of the original pieces, and then supersized to be 66 times bigger…” —via desigboom

Giant LEGO forest with garden flowers in Australia

“LEGO is celebrating 50 years in australia with an array of installations across the country, with the most recent set up in the rural town of Broken Hill, New South Wales. residents of the outback locale were surprised to wake up to a life-size forest made up of 15 four-meter high pine trees and flower sets recreated to a 1:1 ratio of the original pieces, and then supersized to be 66 times bigger…” —via desigboom

street art made of frosting and sugar
Artist Shelley Miller created an impressive azulejos-inspired sugar mural in Victoria, British Columbia. The Stained mural was installed on an a public exterior wall and left up until the rain takes its toll.

“Miller’s use of sugar goes beyond just the novelty of a using a confection in an outdoor art installation.  The artist also uses sugar to draw parallels between the history of the sugar industry and its remnants. For an ongoing project in Brazil, the artist decorated several dilapidated buildings with faux-Portuguese tiles. Brazil, once a booming industry leader in the sugar industry, is now faced with extreme poverty in many areas and echoes of the slave labor that fueled the industry. Ironically, sugar is now considered a luxury in many of these areas, so local children have been known to break off samples of Miller’s art installations to nibble on them.” —Inhabitat

street art made of frosting and sugar

Artist Shelley Miller created an impressive azulejos-inspired sugar mural in Victoria, British Columbia. The Stained mural was installed on an a public exterior wall and left up until the rain takes its toll.

“Miller’s use of sugar goes beyond just the novelty of a using a confection in an outdoor art installation.  The artist also uses sugar to draw parallels between the history of the sugar industry and its remnants. For an ongoing project in Brazil, the artist decorated several dilapidated buildings with faux-Portuguese tiles. Brazil, once a booming industry leader in the sugar industry, is now faced with extreme poverty in many areas and echoes of the slave labor that fueled the industry. Ironically, sugar is now considered a luxury in many of these areas, so local children have been known to break off samples of Miller’s art installations to nibble on them.” —Inhabitat

sugary Design Criminals book
The exhibition catalogue with slipcase for the past Design Criminals exhibition at the Vienna MAK is entirely edible. Made with sugar pastillage, Andreas Pohancenik (from Practice + Theory) designed a typographically unique book and signage for the exhibit.

“…If pastillage often historically represented architecture and objects,  might this tradition be reversed and allow architecture and design to  learn from its now distant relative? If we think of a cake, in some way  at least, as an architectural object, might we also be able to think of  ways in which architecture and design might be able to possess cake-like  qualities?…” —Andreas Pohancenik on “ornament and crime”

(rediscovered via Fast Company)

sugary Design Criminals book

The exhibition catalogue with slipcase for the past Design Criminals exhibition at the Vienna MAK is entirely edible. Made with sugar pastillage, Andreas Pohancenik (from Practice + Theory) designed a typographically unique book and signage for the exhibit.

“…If pastillage often historically represented architecture and objects, might this tradition be reversed and allow architecture and design to learn from its now distant relative? If we think of a cake, in some way at least, as an architectural object, might we also be able to think of ways in which architecture and design might be able to possess cake-like qualities?…” —Andreas Pohancenik on “ornament and crime”

(rediscovered via Fast Company)